UMAI social circle cpg podcast

#18: Food Styling and Product Photography Tips with Ashleigh Amoroso

Photographer, Food Stylist, and Educator Ashleigh Amoroso joins the podcast to discuss what CPG brand owners should know leading up to that big day.

She’s worked with such household names as Magnolia Home (Chip and Joanna Gaines, how cool?!), Patron, and Tillamook – now, she’s sharing some of those lessons learned with YOU. Ya better listen.

Let us break it down for you…

[0:41] Introduction.

[1:05] Meet Ashleigh Amoroso! How she has entered the world of product photography.

[5:20] Go-to tools and props – especially for aspiring food photographers or small-to-medium business owners doing it all. Start by defining your style – hone in on what you really love.

[8:55] Favorite campaigns that Ashleigh Amoroso has worked on so far. Cookbook development. Delta + a big Tokyo trip! Camille Styles Target partnership in L.A. Joanna Gaines + Magnolia Table – can you believe!?

[12:00] How does Ashleigh Amoroso view their personal, slightly darker style.

[15:00] Additional tips for small-to-medium CPG brands! Define your mission, perspective, and colors. Get a mood board together.

[19:00] Setting a scene. Is more alway better? Make sure what’s included is relevant!

[20:00] Courses! Ashleigh Amoroso’s plan for upcoming education.

[21:30] What can small-to-medium CPG brands expect when working with a content creator like Ashleigh Amoroso?

[25:00] The importance of setting expectations with clients while also challenging oneself to be a chameleon. AND, on the flip-side for business owners – bring an openness to those shoots.

[27:00] Who is Ashleigh Amoroso’s dream client?

[29:50] Networking for your craft via Instagram.

[31:30] Ashleigh Amoroso’s new downtown Austin studio space.

[34:10] Social handles + where to find Ashleigh Amoroso.

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Read – #18: Food Styling and Product Photography Tips with Ashleigh Amoroso

 

[AUTOMATED TRANSCRIPT MAY BE SUBJECT TO MINOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS/VARIATIONS]

Narrator:
Calling all consumer goods, business owners and marketing professionals. Does planning content ahead of time, stress you out? Do you want to run Instagram and Facebook ads, but just aren’t sure where to start? If your answer is yes and yes, then our mini course was made for you. It’s 100% free and packed with essential tactics that you can implement as soon as today to join in visit our website@umaimarketing.com/mini-course. All right, let’s get on with the pod.

Alison Smith:
Welcome to the UMAI social circle, where we talk consumer goods, marketing tips to help business owners and marketers grow. We’re Alison and Karin co-founders of UMAI, and we are being joined by photographer, stylist and educator, Ashleigh Amoroso. So she’s led and worked on beautiful campaigns for Target, Patron, Vitamix, Tillamook, Noosa and that’s just to name a few. So Ashley, welcome.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Hi, thanks for having me.

Alison Smith:
Of course. Well, we’d love to just dive right in and learn how you got into the world of photography.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Yeah, so it was kind of in a roundabout way to be honest, which is kind of how I feel like everyone lands in some creative field. But I did not go to school for it or anything. I never really considered it to be a possibility as like a full-time job. So I just kind of learned photography alongside, I apprenticed for a wedding photographer when I was in college and really just learned the technical stuff.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Then I knew I wanted to do that, but I didn’t know what that looked like. I knew I didn’t want to do weddings. So after I moved to Austin, I had a friend who was here, she has a food blog and she’s very well connected in the industry. She was like, “Hey, you do photography. Can you do this ebook that I want to do? And take pictures of the food for the blog.” I was like, “Sure.” So I tried it, I was horrible at it, but I really loved it. So that was in 2008 and I’ve been really interested in growing and doing it ever since.

Karin Samelson:
I love that.

Alison Smith:
What do you mean horrible at it?

Karin Samelson:
I was going to say…

Ashleigh Amoroso:
So horrible. When Instagram first came out and everyone takes pictures of their food and like puts filters on them and their like, “It’s so good.” Yeah, it was like that. I go back and look and the photos are kind of green. They had an Instagram filter on them. It’s like, “Is that macaroni and cheese? I don’t really know.” It’s just, it wasn’t good.

Karin Samelson:
Oh my gosh. The shame of scrolling to the very beginning of Instagram, seeing the Valencia pics and just all of the photos that we thought were like, “Oh yeah, this is art.”

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Totally, yeah. Very, very abstract, avant-garde start to my food photography journey.

Karin Samelson:
That’s awesome. So how did you, I know that you also have super established Instagram feeds like Instagram profiles. Did that come after you really got started in food photography or is that like right alongside?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Yeah, that actually came much later. That was kind of just a weird little kickstart blessing, to be honest. When I started doing the food photography with my friend, who I was telling you about for the e-books earlier, I realized that I love taking the pictures, but I just didn’t have a good grasp of the business side that I needed to understand. I didn’t know how to do my taxes. I didn’t know how to, you know what I mean? I just really, client communication, setting expectations, all of those things, I just really did not understand very well. So that part took the fun out of it for me. So I actually went and worked for Apple at their corporate offices for a few years. I was with their executive relations team. I had an amazing boss, an amazing team I worked with and I learned so much. Because essentially my job there was communicating with internal business partners and doing all of those things that I didn’t know how to do before.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
So that helped me tremendously. My boss was just so super supportive. So when I told them I was considering doing this full time, my husband was very supportive and said, “Okay, let’s let’s make it work.” Then my boss said the same thing. So I then left Apple and started doing this full-time. So I had kind of a weird roundabout way of getting here, but I’m so thankful that it went that way because I needed to learn the stuff I needed to learn from the corporate setting.

Alison Smith:
You were just doing photography on the side as when you were at Apple? Yeah?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Yeah.

Alison Smith:
What a big leap of faith and it worked out. Well, I think this is the hottest question we would love to know. What’s your go to tools, props, et cetera? What does every photographer, aspiring photographer need?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Let’s see, I guess in regards to like an aspiring food photographer, I would say really the best place to start for props is just a defined style. The best way to really kind of do that, if you’re not really sure where to start is to just spend some time on Pinterest. Pin the images that you love, that kind of speak to you, and you’ll start to see kind of a style come together and then without copying, but practice those styles, practice finding out what are they doing in their lighting in those situations? What colors are they using? Are they using hard light, which is probably a flash, are they using soft muted diffused light. Those kinds of things will point you in a direction to give you the kind of props that you’re going to want. So for that, I would say a diffuser, you need a sheer window curtain. You really don’t need a ton to be honest. A seamless is always a good thing to have whatever color. I mean, white is kind of a go-to, but…

Karin Samelson:
So a seamless would be like a backdrop that goes into…

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Yeah, it’s almost like a waterfall kind of effect.

Karin Samelson:
Yeah.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Seamless are always super helpful. One other thing I would say would be just a really great textured, either table or backdrop that you make, which could be out of plywood or contact paper or something like that. Then depending on what you’re trying to take a picture of, you can use that as your background, typically texture can be missing from a lot of photos. So, that’s something I like to incorporate in my backdrops.

Karin Samelson:
I like that.

Alison Smith:
Yeah. I feel like anything can be used as a surface. I know our in-house photographer. She’ll just go to the tile shops and get leftovers. I think that’s, I mean, it looks gorgeous in the photos. That’s cool.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Yeah and you have no idea what you’re looking at. Yeah.

Alison Smith:
Yeah, exactly. Yeah. Zoomed in, probably looks like a mess. Yeah.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
It’s so great. When I first started, I used to use this… First of all, money was tight. So I was trying to get really crafty with these surfaces because you can spend tons of money on this stuff.

Alison Smith:
They’re expensive.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
So, I went to Ikea and I bought the desk tops and I would paint them or I would sand them and rough them up. Then the one that I still have that I use all the time is this matte blackout shade in black. I use it as just a backdrop in a scene so many times, because it’s just this perfect matte. There’s no reflection. It was $30. It’s like my favorite thing I have.

Karin Samelson:
Oh, I love it. Yeah. I really liked the note to first and foremost, define your style. Because I feel like so many times we’ll be talking to a business owner who’s like, “Oh, I really like this. I really like this.” One is just a major studio shot with a really strong flash. One is just that outside, ethereal like shadows. Sometimes it’s really hard to put those two together. So finding your style, I love it. Cool. So what are some of your favorite campaigns that you’ve worked on so far and what made them your favorite?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Oh my gosh. That’s such a nice question. A couple years ago, I worked on a cookbook for about three months in Los Cabos at the one and only Ponia Resort, which was ridiculous. Everyday I was like, “What am I doing here?” I worked with this brilliant chef and this amazing team and, oh my gosh, we were just right on the beach. It was wonderful. That one was a favorite. I worked on a campaign with Delta where we went to Tokyo.

Karin Samelson:
What?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
That was crazy. They were launching this and you know what I don’t even think they do it anymore because of COVID. But they launched a direct flight from Detroit to Tokyo. So they brought me on the inaugural flight to capture the food and the drinks. They had this fancy new first class. So, and then I got to hang out in Tokyo for a week. It was crazy.

Karin Samelson:
Those don’t seem like jobs.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Yeah I think that’s so wild. I was like, “Any minute somebody is going to figure out that they asked the wrong person to come.”

Ashleigh Amoroso:
What else? Let’s see. Oh, when Camille Styles, who’s a local blogger here. Actually, I shouldn’t even call her a blogger. She’s an author, an entertainment guru. She’s totally brilliant. When she signed her campaign with Target, so she’s one of their partners. She brought me with her to LA, which was so fun. I shot that partnership and I’ve done several campaigns with them since, and Camille is just so fun to work with because she completely has a very defined brand. Her team runs like a well-oiled wheel. Everyone has a direction and everybody knows what they’re doing. So I love working with them. I guess, lastly I haven’t really told this one yet because I haven’t been able to. But most recently I’ve been working with Joanna Gaines for her show Magnolia Table and photographing the food and her for that. So I’m really excited to see that.

Alison Smith:
Wow.

Karin Samelson:
That is so exciting. We named a few brands and campaigns and had no idea that those were the peanuts.

Alison Smith:
I know, I’m in the wrong profession. That is amazing. Very cool. I’m from Waco, so Joanna Gaines is my hero.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Shut up, you are? Oh my gosh. Waco is so cute.

Alison Smith:
It’s popping. It was not popping when I lived there. It’s because of Joanna Gaines. It’s totally different, totally transformed.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
They own that town, it is amazing.

Alison Smith:
They literally do. Yeah. Wow. Thank you for sharing all that. That’s amazing. So, one thing we wanted to ask you is, because I do think that, like you were saying, your style is really defined and you come with the dark textures and a lot of shadows that we see a lot and compared to everyone else who’s light and bright constantly. I think it’s really cool to see. So we wanted to ask you, are you trying to evoke emotions or how do you think about what you’re trying to portray when you’re shooting?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
So, those images that you’re talking about are really probably, either they’re jobs that I’ve been given complete creative freedom or their personal shoots.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
I just love those because I like to think of when I’m just creating stuff for myself. I like to just make up an entire story in my mind about where the scene is taking place, probably somewhere in the French countryside. There’s this smell, I make up an entire story in my mind.

Alison Smith:
That’s so cool.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
It’s so easy for me to style the scene and to let everything unfold, because I have a really clear snapshot in time of where this is all taking place. So yeah. I want it to be calming, but I also want it to be undefined. I love capturing a moment where it’s easier for you to look at the photo, like someone pouring or moving or whatever, so that it’s easy for you to look at the photo and just be able to envision what’s happening next.

Karin Samelson:
Oh, that’s really awesome. When you say you’re really telling the story of it, and when you said the French countryside. I love Jamie Beck as well, if you knew who that is. It’s all a story. It’s all the French countryside. I feel that way. I’ve always been drawn to your photography as well, where it’s so put together and it’s well thought out and it looks different than the massly produced things we see. So if somebody was trying to do an at home photo shoot, is that kind of the advice you would give them, set the scene, know what’s taken place at the beginning to the end.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Totally. Yeah, totally. I mean, I haven’t really been teaching the workshops as much since COVID, but when I was doing those more frequently, that’s exactly how I would tell my students to set up a scene. I would have them go on Pinterest, create a mood board, essentially walk them through like a client interaction. What is the story you’re trying to tell? Where are you? What does it smell like? What do you see? What do you feel? Clearly define all those things and then everything else just comes in really easily,

Karin Samelson:
Such good advice. That’s awesome. That’s something I’ve never done. It’s just a hobby of photography, so I think really honing in on, what am I trying to do here? Not just, what’s pleasing to my eyeballs. I think that’s awesome.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
That works too.

Karin Samelson:
A little bit more strategy, I can dig it.

Alison Smith:
What are some more, I mean, give us more tips and advice that these small or extra small CPG brands can create better content.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Yeah. So, oh my gosh. I was so scrappy in the beginning. I’ve got lots of these and I actually still use a lot of them because now that I’ve figured out a way to do things in a hack way. Which I don’t know, it’s not always great, but sometimes it’s great. Well, for CPG brands, if they’re wanting to create their own content in the beginning for budget reasons, the best thing they could do, I mean, they’re going to hate me. I’m driving it home, define your style, do some brand colors, find a color palette, create a mission, define your perspective, create a mood board.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Because a lot of people, it’s easier for them to speak visually than it is to explain verbally. I’m sure you guys encounter this all the time too. But when a client comes to me, the first thing we do is work together to create a mood board so that I understand what they want. Because sometimes it’s very different than what they tell me they want. So for the CPG brands, create a mood board based upon what you’re trying to capture and then invest in a few small things. Like the surfaces I would recommend looking at, I mean, Facebook Marketplace is a treasure trove. Don’t be too good for Goodwill. I still find really cool stuff there. Contact paper on Amazon. Seriously, it’s so cheap and you can get stuff that looks very textural and it’s really, really cheap. Let me see, oh and you know what else is a good thing is, I mean, depending on what you’re trying to share. But for food for me, and I still do this, I contact local ceramicist. We work out trades, let me borrow your ceramics for the shoot.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
I’ll provide you imagery that you can use for your social media.

Alison Smith:
What a great idea.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Yeah and work local where you can, build those relationships because those people are in your industry too. So, somebody’s going to come to them. I mean, whoever’s buying from them is in food or looking at food or loves food because they’re spending that kind of money. So then, they’re going to have your name. So, anything in that realm, I would look out for making connections with people who are in that industry, even distantly in the industry and everything is negotiable. Everything can be traded. You don’t have to spend $400 on a surface and then be stuck to that forever. There’s literally the driveway is sometimes really good.

Alison Smith:
Right. That’s such a good tip. The making connections, how cool is that? Then you’re sharing assets and tagging each other and just getting the word out. But I have to ask how important is the camera? Can it be an iPhone?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Totally. Oh my God, for sure. Yeah, absolutely. Iphones are freaking amazing now. Honestly, the video capabilities are bananas too, but 100% it could be an iPhone. First of all, no one would ever even have to know, especially now that there’s COVID because you can work with clients without ever meeting them. You can take a really good, high-quality image on an iPhone and make it really beautiful. It’s funny. When I was doing the workshops, I used to show, my students, the photo I would take it on the iPhone. Just so that they knew it’s really not about the camera. It’s everything else.

Alison Smith:
Yeah. That’s great to know.

Karin Samelson:
So when you say everything else, when you’re talking about the composition, is more always better, or how would you advise people setting a scene for the first time?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
I would say, I think people’s biggest mistakes with setting a scene is incorporating things that don’t make sense in the scene. So I’m hesitant to answer about more or less and really just say, make sure it’s relevant to what’s happening in the picture. Don’t have a spatula next to a cupcake or… Well, no, that would make sense, but don’t have olive oil sitting in the picture with your cupcakes. It’s like, “Doesn’t make sense at all.” But it looks pretty so you think… So I see a lot of people making that mistake. So as long as it tells the story or it works for the scene. Yeah, more or less, do it.

Karin Samelson:
Yeah so you started offering courses. So what’s going on with that? Are you still doing it?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Oh my gosh. So yeah, I have a lot of big lofty ideas. I have a friend who is actually going to help me bring these back out this year and we’re going to do them in videos. So now that I have the studio, we’re probably going to start filming that in a couple of months. So, I’ve been doing the in-person or virtual workshops, which is really either one-on-one or in a group setting for a few years. I love doing them, but I was doing them in a way, where they were very tailored to the individual who was attending the workshop. I started to see that that was really just taking up too much time to do it that way. So I needed a general format that could reach a lot more people. So we’re kind of transitioning now into something where it’ll be like an a la carte kind of thing. They can buy whatever, if they want to know about the technical stuff, if they want to know about the business side, if they want to know about styling.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
That way people can come for what they need. Because I’m such a perfectionist and I would want to spend so much time, I’m not spinning my wheels, creating this very specialized course for each person.

Karin Samelson:
Yeah.

Alison Smith:
When are those set to launch?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
I would love to know. Let me know.

Alison Smith:
We’ll follow up with that question. That’s a great call. I mean shoot, I would love to learn more about that and take your course.

Karin Samelson:
I know, can I take the course? When we’re talking about the business side too, what can brands, who do have the budget, opening up to hire somebody like you. What can they expect when they hire you on?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
That’s a great question. I would say they should maybe enter with trust.

Karin Samelson:
Yeah. Good for anybody working with a creative in general. I love that.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
You know what, this is very specific to a brand, who is for the first time able to allocate a budget for something like this, which is going to be expensive. It’s going to feel like a lot of pressure. It’s a big deal. I go into those situations with a very good understanding of that, this is a big deal. Their expectations are huge. So it’s hard for them to enter into the kind of partnership with me, a stranger, not want to micromanage that situation. So what we did was, a lot of people don’t come to me, like I said and to you guys too I’m sure, with like a clear vision. So we essentially speak visually.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
We have them create a mood board if they don’t already have a really clear, defined brand, which I want to clarify, you don’t have to come to me with that. We can get you there. We walk through a process together, where before the day of the shoot, there is zero ambiguity. You know everything that we’re doing, you know what you’re going to get. Everything is very clear and you can kind of sit back and relax. Then what I end up trying to do is over deliver in those situations, because I have a very clear definition of what they’re looking for. So, I know it’s hard, but come in with trust.

Karin Samelson:
Yeah. That’s great. Great advice. But when it comes to even the smaller stuff, like if it’s food and beverage brand. Do they need to come in with the supplies and do they need to have a chef with you cooking? How does that look?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
So it kind of depends. I have a really awesome team with me now that I’ve worked on several shoots. I’ve got a food stylist. I have a videographer. I have a wonderful chef. Myself and my assistant do a lot of the prop styling just because we enjoy it. But I also have a prop styling partner. So when they come to me, that’s one of the initial questions that we’ll ask without trying to overwhelm them really. But like, “Have you identified a prop situation? Do you have samples? If you’re a new company, are you able to get them? Can you ensure shipping?” We kind of make sure that we run through all of that stuff first. Then if they say no, I send them over information for all of my people and offer to do a full production for them and just take care of everything. So they can be as involved as they want or not, and they can really just sit behind their computer and say, “Yes, no, yes, no.”

Karin Samelson:
One stop shop. That makes it so much easier for brands around the nation to work with you. Especially when they can just fill out that mood board, show you what they are inspired by, what they’re aspiring to be like.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Totally.

Karin Samelson:
It’s great.

Alison Smith:
How difficult is it as a photographer to blend your aesthetic with the client’s aesthetic expectation, et cetera.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
So I like this question because a lot of the work that I share is work, that either is emotionally or personally me. However, a lot of the work that I do, I don’t bring that vision in. I have a very defined technical skill. While I do appreciate a certain style of things myself, I only bring them in when they’re necessary. A lot of places, brands contact me for things that are different than what you see on my page. They want the bright. They want the white, they want the cut-out, they want the hard light, they want something totally different. So I want to be a chameleon to be able to do those things because I want to work. So when appropriate, I am make suggestions that I think would work. But sometimes my personal aesthetic doesn’t work for the brand I’m working with. I like the challenge of trying to evoke the message that they’re trying to say.

Alison Smith:
Sure I liked that you said, I mean, you just have to be a chameleon and be a blank slate coming in.

Karin Samelson:
Yeah I think that’s such a good note for business owners. Because a lot of times things that we see with creatives is that they do bring their look and feel and aesthetic, a little bit too much. Where it kind of all looks the same, and you can’t really tell what brand that is because it looks like that brand. So super respectable. So when you think of a consumer packaged good brand, that you would have a dream collaboration with, a dream client who would they be.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Oh my God. Okay. This one is tough because I mean, to be honest, every client that comes to me as a dream client, because it’s another day that I’m working. Every email makes me excited, small company, big company, every single one. So I mean, I feel like I’ve worked with my dream clients. I feel like I am working with my dream clients. Every day I get an email with a new client. It is my dream client.

Karin Samelson:
Yeah, that’s amazing. Even if they can’t fly you to Tokyo or Cabo, still a cool client.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Those were exceptional, that’s not realistic.

Karin Samelson:
All I think is you’re photographing on a plane and I’m such a novice. But man, the pressure of it.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Oh my gosh. It was so weird for the people flying. Because they’re like, “What’s this girl doing?” I’m like, “Hi, can you hold your champagne into the light?” They’re like, “Who are you?” I’m like, “I’m going to Tokyo, just come on.”

Karin Samelson:
I want to see these photos. That’s awesome.

Alison Smith:
I know, me too.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
We actually, so they had a whole team that was doing a social media kind of campaign and they ended up creating a whole video. I’ll send it to you guys. So it was really cool.

Karin Samelson:
That’s awesome. I also love how you’ve worked with super and are working with really powerful women in Texas, too. It’s just like, “Wow.”

Ashleigh Amoroso:
That’s your dream come true too. Also commercial photography is only 9% women, which is garbage. I mean, I feel really fortunate to be somehow a part of that. But I mean that industry, those people hiring, those agents, those people with the ability to make those hires really need to be paying attention to the women photographers. There’s just so much talent. It’s crazy. It’s crazy that there are not more women. So whenever I am hired, in specifically a women owned business or women of power position, I’m beside myself. Because that’s what I want to be doing, that’s where I want to be.

Karin Samelson:
Yeah. How are you making these connections to these people?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
I don’t know. Okay. So you asked me this earlier and I probably just didn’t answer it, but kind of Instagram. Whenever I left Apple, I started really focusing on the Instagram and this was back in 2015, because it was, at that time and even kind of still now, Instagram is the best way to connect with people about your craft. I mean, before that you had Facebook, but Facebook was more of a personal platform and food photographers before that had books that agents would take around to other agencies and pitch you. So unless you were in New York or LA, who’s going to see your food photography, hence the rise of Instagram.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
So then what happened was people realized that they could find talent in other places other than New York and LA. They could find new talent, talent that didn’t have to operate on a $30,000 budget. So that just kind of opened a ton of doors. I think what happened was I got put on a bunch of agency rosters and if I’m not with the agency, they’ll recommend me either for local reasons or because someone has worked with me before. I think that’s how a lot of stuff comes to me to be honest.

Karin Samelson:
That’s awesome. Yeah. I mean, that’s how I was led to you. I have been, fan girl moment. I’ve been following you for a very, very long time. I end up unfollowing a ton of people. I don’t do a lot of personal social because my job is social. I want to be on it as little as possible. So I would absolutely follow Ashleigh. She has two really amazing accounts and I think it does tell a story, the way you post, the way you do everything on social.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Oh thanks.

Karin Samelson:
So I think that’s wonderful. Yeah and speaking of that, you just bought, you just started renting a studio space downtown, tell us about it.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Yeah so I just leased a studio space downtown, it’s on Eighth and Congress, which is even weird to say. This was a dream that I just, I don’t know. I never really saw coming to fruition because I just didn’t see it as feasible. But the stars aligned and it worked out and with Claire Brody Designs, she’s like a vintage dealer. She’s an interior designer, moved to vintage dealer. She’s on the bottom floor and then in another room is Jenna McElroy, Who’s also a photographer, but she does more personal branding and family’s portraits, that kind of thing. And then me. So we’re all in the building together. We’ve literally only had the keys for two weeks and we’re all renovating the place. So it’s my goal to put in a modular kitchen, because I try to rent food photography studios all the time.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
There’s always just a missing element or it’s an Airbnb that wants this crazy permit or there’s just some complicated element. It’s difficult to find a fully functional food photography kitchen that has the offerings of a photography studio. So, I’m going to make everything that I’m missing. I have lots of grand lofty ideas here, but the ultimate goal is for me to start doing all of my shoots out of there. Then to also rent it out to other kitchen creatives, to either do shoots or film or whatever they want to do in that space as well.

Alison Smith:
How freaking cool. Is there a name for it or is it Ashleigh Amoroso?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Yeah, it’s just Ashleigh Amoroso Studios right now.

Karin Samelson:
But yeah, I love it. So cool. I mean, we hope to rent it out from you one day because that really is such a pain point. I feel like, it’s finding the space, finding a really beautiful space where you can do everything. So Austin Brands, someday, rent this spot out for your photo shoots.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Yay and then we’ll work together.

Alison Smith:
Well, this was really fun. Ashleigh, do you want to leave our listeners with how they can find you? Is it your Instagram or any anywhere else?

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Sure yeah. My Instagram, I have two there’s my personal one, which is Ashleigh Amoroso, which is spelled A S H L E I G H. I know, but I like it. That’s my food one and then my personal one is Ashamor, A S H A M O R. Then all the stuff is linked in those places. Instagram’s fun. That’s where I’m probably the most active.

Karin Samelson:
Awesome and you’re available for hire. So hit her up, if you need a photographer.

Ashleigh Amoroso:
Come get me.

Narrator:
Ooh, my social circle is a CPG agency driven podcast based out of Austin, Texas. We’re excited to share more behind the scene insights, chats with industry leaders, and whatever else we learn along the way. Follow us on Instagram at UMAI marketing or check out our website umaimarketing.com. Catch you back here soon.

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