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#3: Siete Foods Mukbang, How They Nurture a +300k Community of Engaged Followers

Y’all are in for a literal treat this episode! It’s this duo’s first mukbang: chip and dip Siete Foods edition. 

Alison and Karin taste test Siete Foods Spicy Blanco Cashew Queso with Grain Free Tortilla Chips (Sea Salt & Jalapeno). Then, break down the brand’s mission to better understand why their sizable Instagram following is soo engaged.

Let us break it down for you…

[1:03] Today’s mukbang product is Siete Spicy Blanco Cashew Queso! Initial thoughts, branding, ingredients.
[2:50] First, it’s time for a taste test.
[5:50] Before this, picking up Siete Foods from Whole Foods.
[6:18] Then, we take a deep dive into the greater Siete Foods brand! How’d they get their engaged, devoted audience – stellar following AND engagement (an honestly rare combo).
[9:37] Customer delight in the comments section + how our agency engages.
[13:45] Positive impact of leveraging user-generated content on their (and your own) Instagram feed
[14:29] Showing up through IGTV During times of COVID-19 getting on the IGTV!
[16:48] Posting more than just product photos – maintain authenticity and leverage software (our recommendations).
[19:20] Messaging buckets in action. Problem-solution minded approach.
[20:25] Supplemental content on Stories and how it turns a brand into a family that you want to be a part of.
[23:03] Touching on influencer partnerships and a memory from Expo West.
[28:41] Beautiful content, specifically photography created in house. Duping that content for retail advertising.
[30:15] Finally, the use of witty copy across the board. If you’re a fun brand, be fun and funny!
[32:00] Wrap it up – take the elements that would work for you (and your brand) and implement them TOMORROW. Piece by piece.

Alison:

Hey, hey y’all, Alison here. I wanted to quickly thank you for listening to our podcasts. I know you’re

about to get a lot of valuable information from it, but I also wanted to pop in and share with you guys a

free SOP, which stands for Standard Operating Procedure. We use this SOP every single day in our

agency to authentically grow and engage our audiences on social. It is 1000% free and I’d love for you to

have it and use it in your biz as well. So just go to umaimarketing.com/engage to go download. All right,

cheers.

Alison:

Hello everyone. Welcome to the Umai Social Circle. I am Alison.

Karin:

I’m Karin.

Alison:

And that’s Karin. Today, we are doing a little taste test. We are tasting Siete Foods’ Cashew Queso and

Spicy Blanco. I’m not going to lie. I already ate probably the majority of mine, but that’s okay.

Karin:

Yeah. And I know… So Alison and I have the exact same cashew queso. But for some reason our lids are

different, but I’m sure they just ran out of blue lids and had to put white lids on. But, it’s smells. I mean,

it smells like queso, it has that tomato-y spice smell that comes with any cheesy queso.

Alison:

Smells good. Also, can we just talk about how cute this is? All Siete branding is amazing. They really play

into the Mexican culture, use a lot of colors and it just kind of makes you want to grab it off the shelf, no

matter what product. I’m also having some of their chips too, and just, it’s all colorful and bright and

definitely not boring, which I like.

Karin:

Absolutely. I mean, if I was in the aisle and I was looking for a vegan queso, I mean, even if I didn’t know

what the Siete brand was all about, the packaging just is going to immediately draw me in.

Alison:

Yep. It’s fire. And also, we had talked about this a little bit before the pod, but it’s blowing my mind, the

ingredients in this queso, so number one, first ingredient’s water, then cashews and then it has your

tomatoes and onion, green pepper, but basically you’re hydrating when youKarin:

Yeah, first ingredient’s water. That means it’s okay that you ate the whole jar already right?

Alison:

Because I’m about to finish it. Okay. Let’s dig in.

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Karin:

Yeah, let’s try it.

Alison:

I’ll pretend like it’s my first time. (silence) So it’s nutty, it’s cashew obviously. So you kind of get the

nuttiness, slight queso taste, but really, to me it’s not… It’s like another dip. It’s not a queso, but I love it.

Karin:

Yeah. It’s delicious. I mean, how… So, full disclosure, I am not vegan. I don’t eat a lot of vegan foods, so

I’m not sure how the nutritional yeast plays into giving it that cheesy texture and flavor. So I don’t really

know what that’s supposed to taste like, so yeah, I completely agree. It tastes like dip. It’s delicious. If

someone had this in a bowl at a party, I would be eating it just like it was a bean dip, even though it’s

not beans.

Alison:

It’s also paleo, gluten free, vegan, grain free, dairy free, soy free, justKarin:

It’s delicious. Yeah. I don’t like using the phrase, “guilt-free,” I don’t because guilt should never be a part

of eating.

Alison:

Oh my gosh.

Karin:

But it’s just like, I could eat this whole thing and really not regret a second of it.

Alison:

[inaudible 00:04:15] I did it. No ragrets. Yeah. Really great. I always wonder if you’re a truly vegan and

have been your whole life and never tasted a queso, I’m sure this is it for you.

Karin:

Right? And I mean, the texture, when you come in right out of the fridge, it’s a little bit thick, but heating

it up, they said, “Use a saucepan,” I used a wide pan. So it would heat faster and be more even, and it

really did come out a little bit more liquidity, but still really thick. So I mean, if you can make some

nachos out of these, some vegan nachos.

Alison:

I did see on their stories yesterday that one of their customer delight specialists that, they all get on and

do stories, which is really cool, did a avocado toast topped with some queso, yeah. It looked great.

Karin:

I like that. I mean, it’s not spicy, sorry.

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Alison:

I’m getting a little… But again, it could be my chips.

Karin:

Yeah. You’re eating the jalapeno chips. I’m eating it with just their grain-free sea salt tortilla chips. And

it’s not coming through, not even a hint of spice. I mean, it’s delicious.

Alison:

Yeah, but not spicy. It’s more for us regular [inaudible 00:05:36] who can’t handle… I’m like, “This is

perfect.”

Karin:

A lady at Whole Foods… So Allison and I went to whole foods to pick this up and she was navigating us

to the refrigerated section, the vegan refrigerated section, plant-basedAlison:

Great point, it’s refrigerated. Your other run of the mill quesos are on the shelf, all those preservatives in

them.

Karin:

So she told us where it was. She showed us where it was. She told us that Spicy Blanco was her favorite.

And she said that she wasn’t a fan of spice and that she loved it. So thank you for the heads up Whole

Foods employee.

Alison:

Yeah. Very helpful. All right. So today we’re not just eating on camera or podcast for you. We love Siete

brands. They are local Austin, but they go well beyond Austin. I think most people are aware of them.

Great products, great brand, great culture. So today we’re going to talk about how they were able to

build such an engaged, devoted community, because their community is just fire. So we’re going to do a

little deep dive and get in there and give you some tips from what Siete’s done on how you can apply it

to your own brand.

Karin:

Yeah. So we are going to be focusing on how the brand was able to build such an engaged, devoted

audience. Not only do they have hundreds of thousands of followers on Instagram, it’s really the

engagement that those followers provide for them that impresses us so much, impresses everyone. I

mean, this is a brand to aspire to. And it’s one that we always look to for inspiration. And when it comes

to the content, when it comes to the visuals, it’s just something… It’s just really well done, right? So first

off I think that the biggest way that they were able to really… To begin with Siete, seven, it’s

representative of the seven family members, the Garza family that created the brand. And I think that

speaks volumes, right? So the bird, we found out is a heron and in Spanish, I believe Garza means heron.

Alison:

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Right. It translates in some way to Garza. So it’s all about family from, I mean, asset number one, it’s

kind of like their foundation.

Karin:

Definitely. And on their mission page, it always mentions family first, family second, business third. And I

think that that is immensely prevalent in all things that they do in their marketing. I mean, when they do

their commercials and their videos, the family’s there. It’s all of them, it’s not hired actors. So I think that

that’s a very, very beautiful touch that is seen throughout their marketing.

Alison:

Right. Even on this queso, and I’m sure it’s on some other, yeah, all the products, is they have this abuela

approved stamp. It’s right next to their gluten free certified stamp, just a nice little trademark touch. It

makes you feel warm and cozy and you kind of think of this abuela, your old grandma just like beating

you or something like that. And that’s how it feels to eat their products, which I love, so very prevalent.

Karin:

Yeah, I love that [inaudible 00:09:04]. And their slogan, their tagline, [foreign language 00:09:08], sorry

about my pronunciation. Truly, truly sorry. But it means, “Together is better.” And I don’t think that is

only their family. I think that does extend to their overall team. I’m sure they’re all family, but not blood

relatives. And I like how you said that their customer support team is on the stories, that they have free

range to just get on the stories, to share what they’re eating, to share what they’re doing.

Alison:

Right. Yeah. And that, that brings to a next point. If you look at their team page, it’s stacked, there’s

seven people whose job is customer delight, which just goes to show you how much they value making

their customers happy.

Karin:

I think that’s incredible. I wonder how many of them are actually doing the community engagement on

Instagram, right?

Alison:

Yeah. Because it’s a lot.

Karin:

It’s a lot. Yeah.

Alison:

It’sKarin:

They’re responding to absolutely everything.

Alison:

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Right. Every single thing. And that’s one thing that… I mean, what do you say, Karin, would you

recommend a business owner to, I guess not an owner, but someone from a brand to respond to every

single comment? How important is that on social?

Karin:

I mean, hopefully everybody that’s listening knows how important it is.

Alison:

We got doggies.

Karin:

We got dogs and they have new bark collars and they’re dinging.

Alison:

Are they noise or vibrator ones?

Karin:

It’s vibrating, yeah. And it’s dinging, you can hear it. Yeah. I mean, it’s incredibly important to respond to

everything, positive comments and honestly, more importantly, negative comments. We’re huge

advocates of, if there’s something that’s super customer related, customer service related, like I got this

bag of chips and they were all crushed or I got this bag of chips, and I know that they get that, I’m sure.

Karin:

Or it’s almost empty. We want to navigate you to actual customer service on email to get it off of your

social platform. I don’t know what Siete does, if they handle it internally, on the platform or in DM’s, but

what we would do and what we do for our clients is to push them to email customer service and to take

care of them thereAlison:

Get the negative off the front facing things, right?

Karin:

Yeah. Especially if you’re running ads, you want to spend money running ads and serving ads to people

that are going to see these negative comments in this comment section. It doesn’t make any sense. So I

think it’s incredible that you can see… I mean, this one has 70 comments on it and they are all being

responded to. It’s not like they’re just liking the comments. They’re taking time to say words to these

peopleAlison:

Right. So it’s beyond just customer service. Someone comments something back, and they’re at least

saying, “I know, right?” They’re engaging and they’re being witty and fun with these people. So it goes

beyond customer service where, I mean, it ties back to being a community. That’s how you feel if you’re

commenting and interacting with Siete.

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Karin:

Absolutely.

Alison:

Something every business can implement… I mean, it’s not easy, it takes work to get in there and

respond to everyone and think about what to say, but something that anyone can do.

Karin:

Right. And so what we do internally is every morning we sign on for our clients and make sure that every

comment that we have missed from Instagram, from Facebook to Twitter, to DM’s across the board,

that we’re properly engaging with them, that we’re interacting with them. And then we’ll do it

throughout the day. But if we can’t do it throughout the day, we make sure to at least do it in the

morning and the last thing we do before we sign off for the day, because we want to be able to provide

really exceptional customer service and get back to people with any questions they have or praise or

anything like that. And then, most importantly, I think it puts your finger on the pulse of what people are

resonating with, what people really like, what issues are arising. So yeah, I think the community

engagement is so, so key. And that’s how you grow your brand online.

Alison:

Right. Let’s talk about their other themes that you’re kind of seeing, because I mean, it helps, it

obviously helps that they’ve got beautiful branding, full of tons of colors. So their feed is just wow. You

get there and you’re already having a fun time just looking at all these beautiful photos, but what else

are they doing on here?

Karin:

Yeah. I mean, well, going backwards really quick to all of their beautiful photos. It’s like most of these

are user generated. It’s insane. All of them are by really incredible influencers and content creators,

making these gorgeous, stunning photos for them. And I truly wonder how many, if any, are paid for.

Are all of these organic and it’s just love for the brand? And obviously it’s really awesome to get a shout

out on a platform that has 340,000 followers.

Alison:

Heck yeah.

Karin:

But yeah, I think what an incentive to grow a community, not just sales, but literally free content. So

other things that we’re seeing… So during times of COVID, we’re seeing this, Juntos at Home, is that?

Yeah. And they’re bringing people on to IGTV to educate and share, and we’re seeing a lot of brands do

that, but this is super branded, super clean. It kind of makes me think. I’m like, “How do they do it so

seamlessly?” Even when it comes to the cover photo on stories. It’s perfect how in the feed in their 1000

X 1000 dimensions, you can see a beautiful, clear, crisp, bright photo with Juntos at Home. And then

when you click through to that IGTV, the touches of the borders that they put on top and bottom to

make it even more beautiful and branded, but not messing up what’s happening on the feed, it’s just

super thoughtful. Whoever’s doing this is so thoughtful.

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Alison:

Yeah. That’s a big thing that we struggle with too is you want your feed to stay beautiful and what’s the

word I’m looking for?

Karin:

Curated?

Alison:

Curated, right. But you also want to educate in different ways. So I mean, I would definitely, like you

said, look to Siete Foods and see how they did that because it does… It looks seamless. But another

thing that’s great about the Juntos at Home is… Okay, first of all, it’s playing into their tagline, [foreign

language 00:15:54], and then during Coronavirus, that might’ve been an, “Oh shit,” moment, [foreign

language 00:16:03] is obviously not what you want to be doing during Coronavirus, but they spun it in a

way that perfectly resonated with the times and their brand, “Together at home.” Such a great… Yeah.

Karin:

What a pivot. And it’s just so well done, right? It’s it doesn’t seem like it’s grasping, you’re not grasping

for this. It’s very organic, if you will. And judging by the amount of views that are on it, it looks like it’s

resonating with people.

Alison:

But also, I mean, I know you said you do want it to be well done, but I think a lot of brands are scared to

show that inner side or behind the scenes and things like that because it’s not always picture perfect,

nice. So Karin, what would be your suggestion to help some a smaller brand, who’s not Siete yet, post

more than just product photos?

Karin:

That’s such a good reminder. Honestly, sometimes I get lost and I’m looking at this and I’m like, “It’s so

well done. It’s so beautiful. How can we do this?” But it is so important to remember that smaller

brands, where the CEO is running everything, the social, fulfillment, logistics, sales, and it’s not feasible.

So I would say, try and be as authentic as possible because I mean, you see it too Alison, in ads.

Sometimes the most beautiful studio photo does not perform as well as the user generated content. So I

would say, just try and be as authentic as possible and use software to your advantage. So find tools and

software that work for you and are in your budget and create really beautiful content that way.

Alison:

So what would be a good piece of software? What is affordable? Later is one.

Karin:

So personally, I would figure out a good photo editing software. So whether that’s VSCO or it’s

Afterlight, there are so many out there at different price points, but those, I would say are my two

favorite for editing on my phone, outside of the Adobe suite and Canva, I feel like Canva’s super popular

because it’s so easy to use and it’s not very expensive. And you can lay in your logo, you can lay in your

brand colors and templates and create templates. What softwares you like?

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Alison:

Well, mostly I’m doing ad editing. If y’all don’t know, Karin is our organic guru, we have the Adobe suite

so it’s not very fair. I use the Adobe Spark app, which is amazing. I highly recommend that. And then

other than that, I’m using video editing apps. One I use is Splice, and it’s free, but yeah. And then in

terms of scheduling, I think Later would be a good beginner scheduler. I’m trying to think what else,

because like you were saying, if you’re a business owner and you’re trying to do 500 other things, you

need to get your content scheduled out so that you can go on and focus on getting your product into

retail stores or what have you.

Karin:

Right. So we always preach about the messaging buckets. And when you’re thinking of your content

strategy, focusing in on those messaging buckets and then providing your consumer with a solution,

right? So you’re gluten intolerant. You need to find really flavorful foods. You miss all those foods that

you used to have. Okay, well, these are the foods we provide that are gluten free. This is how you can

eat them. This is what you can make with them. These are fun, different ways to use them and playing

off of your mission, why your brand is what it is. And with Siete, their mission is to bring Mexican

American foods to the table, I believe. I’m going to actually look at their website to say that. So “Boldly

build the leading healthy Mexican American food brand,” and with the togetherness and the community

and the family aspect as a leading driver of that. A lot of their Instagram honestly, is really beautiful

food, which brings you in. But the supplemental community content is whatAlison:

It keeps you there longer yeah.

Karin:

Yeah. And it’s the most impressive.

Alison:

Totally. So the Juntos at Home, we love that. Siete Scaries, have you seen that one?

Karin:

So I’ve seen those in real time, in real time on their stories, but it looks like they have a highlight on

Instagram about it, but it’s literally their team members scaring each other, which is the most delightful

thing. It has nothing to do with the product.

Alison:

It brings me so much joy.

Karin:

Yeah. But in all reality, it really does have everything to do with the product. It’s them enjoying each

other’s company. It’s the communityAlison:

They’re a family. Right.

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Karin:

They’re a family. I think it’s so… It’s entertaining and right, social media is supposed to be educational

and entertaining and they have that down, for sure.

Alison:

And it makes you feel like you know them. I mean, yeah. All ties back to family first, family second.

Karin:

And the same with their, they have this workout. They have a huge workout room at their office and

they’re always doing these team workouts together. And it’s just all those behind the scenes that

literally have nothing to do with the brand or the food. It’s just helping bring people back into the social

platforms and engaging with them. It’s fun to say like, “Hey, I see this one girl on Instagram all the time,

she’s on their marketing team. Is that who I’m talking to?” When I comment with them. You’re talking to

humans, right?

Alison:

Yeah. It creates super fans for sure. And Karin and I were talking, we want a tee shirt. We want a Siete tshirt, a hat, whatever we can get, because we’re super fans now. I mean, we love the food. We love

what you’re doing on social. Everything’s just curated and beautiful, but it’s also fun. So I mean, that’s

what they doing.

Karin:

And I mean, we can’t lose focus on how important branding is, too. I feel like sometimes we have small

CPG businesses coming to us and wanting to work with us and their packaging, their website, not

everything is tightened up and it’s not something that we personally would purchase. And I think that

that is very vital in how you think about marketing as a whole. You have to make sure that that branding

is on point to begin with, obviously that the product is on point and then everything else will fall into

place with the right tools and the right work and the right levers being pulled. ButAlison:

There’s still some foundational steps, right?

Karin:

Yeah.

Alison:

Right.

Karin:

Cool. So I think another way that is just so impressive with Siete, is their influencer partnerships. I have

no idea what their program looks like. Everybody’s influencer program looks different, but I just

remember at Expo West, maybe two years ago, I was walking the floor with a micro-influencer andAlison:

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Oh, look at you. You’re famous by association.

Karin:

And we were passing this Siete foods booth and we literally could not get past. We couldn’t get past, it

was stacked to the brim.

Alison:

It was full? Wow.

Karin:

It was full, I’m talking 30 people in front of this booth. And if you’ve ever to a trade show like that, you’re

just trying to get like five to six. You’re trying to build this buzz, but it was just stacked. I couldn’t even

get past, she ended up knowing half of the people there because it was all influencers. There were all

these social media influencers, talking and laughing and hanging. Yeah.

Alison:

And the influencers were just flocking to them.

Karin:

They were just hanging there. Well, and IAlison:

That is not that easy you guys

Karin:

No, no, it is not that easy.

Alison:

Not normal.

Karin:

This is not normal. It’s incredible. And we can talk about it being incredible, but this is not normal. And a

lot of legwork had to go into getting there. Again, going back to the community and building it. But I

have no idea how they do it. One of our favorite Instagrammers, The Defined Dish, such a great

cookbook, such a great Instagram. She is the biggest Siete Foods advocate. I mean, her pop socket on

her phone is a Siete Foods, pop socket.

Alison:

Is it really? I saw her redo a healthy Taco Bell Crunchwrap Supreme, but with all Siete products, and that

was life changing, so. But how do you think… Do you think that they reached out to her because she’s

big time. Are you able to tell what maybe their influencer program looks like, just from the front facing

things?

Karin:

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I mean, I wish, I feel likeAlison:

Tell us, Siete.

Karin:

I know, tell us, yeah. I feel like this must be… Well, number one, it’s a longterm relationship. I do not

believe that what they’re doing has short term relationships. Like for instance, some brands will partner

with somebody who’s… They’re like, “Yu have to post three times, it’s going to be $2,000. This is what

you say, hashtag ad.” That is not what they’re doing. And there’s such a benefit to that because of what

they’re building. So I don’tAlison:

I think it’s beyond just the business. Here’s the bullet points, here’s what you get paid. It’s more…

Maybe they’re, they’re just sending product to continue the relationship after the business part is done

orKarin:

Yeah. Maybe that’s what’s happening. Maybe they’re doingAlison:

It also helps to have a great product, again.

Karin:

Again, yeah. So I’ve noticed in the past that they would do these retreats, where they would invite a

bunch of influencers then they would have these backyard dinners and concerts, here in Austin in their

office quarters. And I assume that they paid for them to come, paid for all of that jazz and gave them a

super Instagram worthy space that they would share. And maybe afterwards they just provided product.

I don’t know. I’m assuming. And I shouldn’t assume, because I literally have no idea, but something that

we do with our influencer programs is starting off with just engaging as much as possible with these

people and actually making sure, one, that they are an influencer that you want to work with, that has

the beliefs in food as you do.

Karin:

If you’re a food product, I don’t think they’re going to be working with anybody that is posting about

Burger King all the time. And follow them, engage with them, DM them, create a part… Not a

partnership yet. Create a friendship, create just a relationship in general that’s beyond you just trying to

shove your product down their throat. And then following up later, once that relationship has been

established and saying, “Hey, we love what you do. I think you’d love our product too. Can we send you

some for free to see what you think,” and then going from there, right? It’s like, if they love it, they’re

going to reach back out.

Alison:

It is a long game.

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Karin:

It’s a long game. Oh man.

Alison:

And it is a lot of work. It’s a long game, but it’s worth it. Do you think with a Siete, the parties that you

saw in the past, were those mostly micro influencers? Because Defined Dish is big, but do you think they

were focusing on like smaller groups of influencers?

Karin:

No, I don’t think… I mean, different people have different definitions of micro and macro influencers.

And I honestly don’t know the exact definition, but in my head I’m like, “Okay, micro influencers are

people that are under 40,000 followers and above that, they’re more macro.” And I know that’s

different for everybody. Some people will say, “At a million followers, you’re a macro.” So I think that

most of them had more than a hundred thousand followers. They were super Salish and they have… It’s

like this tight knit community of mostly, honestly women. And they all know each other, they all work

together on the same brands.

Karin:

And if you get one of them on board and really loving your brand, I think it’s really possible for them to

introduce it to their friends. And I think last, but not least, when it comes to how they’ve been able to

build such an engaged and devoted audience, is their content being so beautiful and entertaining. But I

do know that they have somebody working internally. I think it’s their creative director. He’s not just a

photographer for them, but their creative director. He used to be a photographer for The Ellen Show.

And his work is just incredible. If you go into their Instagram and you see their Kroger announcement,

it’s not like other retail announcements that you see. It’s so beautiful.

Alison:

It is.

Karin:

Look how well done that is. And that’s professional level stuff. And again, this doesn’t happen. That is

not normal.

Alison:

Yeah. They’ve got a talented team that they’ve built, that’s for sure.

Karin:

Yeah. So for our clients, when it comes to retailer announcements, obviously you can put their logo on a

photo of the product, but a nice touch is going to the retailer, going outside and taking a photo or a

boomerang of your product in front of the retail face. And that’s always a great announcement. You can

use it in ads.

Alison:

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Page 13 of 14

Yeah. That’s the most simple way and it’s effective. Siete has taken it to the next level. So what’s new.

And then other than that, I mean, I know we’ve hit a lot on their content, but I just have to do a quick

shout out of how fire their copy is, likeKarin:

Oh my gosh.

Alison:

It’s witty. And it’s very difficult, especially if you’re trying to get four to five pieces of content out a week,

to be witty all the time, talking about the same few products. So if you’re a funny person, that’s great.

I’m happy for you because it’s so fun to read their copy.

Karin:

Yeah. And honestly, I think you saved the best for last. Their copy is honestly one of my favorite things

about their social media and it’s notAlison:

I’m just LOL-ing reading it right now.

Karin:

It’s not easy to do at all. And I remember looking at this years ago and being like, “How are they going to

keep this up?”

Alison:

Yeah. Seriously. Okay, I just have to give this example. So we were talking about the healthy Siete

Crunch Wrap Supreme. This might be a photo that… Oh, looks like someone else. So I think the divine

dish started the crunch wrap, but now everyone’s creating one from Siete products, but their caption,

“How much munch would a munch crunch munch, if a munch crunch could crunch much?” It’s so good.

And then it goes on, but oh man, I just love that.

Karin:

It’s just, I do not understand how you can create so many puns and I’m really imagining this person,

whoever this is, to just be, spitting this out. Just quick, so quick and just fire every time.

Alison:

Pretty impressive.

Karin:

Yeah. So to close it out, this is a brand that we admire greatly. We think that they’re doing such amazing

work. And I think it’s important for small to medium sized CPG owners to look at brands like this and get

inspired and get hyped because they could be doing the same thing someday. And knowing that they

might have crazy resources that the average business owner does not have, but you can take elements

and use tools and software and friends and family and do your best to create something similar.

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Page 14 of 14

Alison:

That’s such a good point. Don’t let this discourage you. Take the elements that you can implement

tomorrow. Engage, commenting back on every single person. I mean, that’s huge on its own.

Karin:

Can you get your face onto your stories more often? Can you talk to your consumers, talk with them,

instead of at them.

Alison:

And share your mission in everything you do, make that super prevalent because people that resonate

with that mission are going to love everything that you’re doing with it. So should we close this out with

a cheers? A queso cheers?

Karin:

Yeah. Let’s do it. I’ve got to open mine back up.

Alison:

I’m empty, so… There’s crumbs at the bottom.

Karin:

All right. Thank you, Siete, for the product.

Alison:

Cheers.

Karin:

Cheers. Umai Social Circle is a CPG agency driven podcast, based out of Austin, Texas. We’re excited to

share more behind the scene insights, chats with industry leaders or whatever else we learn along the

way. Follow us on Instagram, @umaimarketing or check out our website, umaimarketing.com. Catch

you back here soon.

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